TradeBriefs Editorial From the Editor's Desk

How to Set Goals That You Can Actually Complete - Ravi Shankar Rajan
Psychologist John Lee Dumas doesn't mince words when it comes to the idea of setting goals. Dumas says so many people see goal-setting as a roadblock: "They say, 'I don't know how to choose the goal I'm going to focus on because there are so many things and so many choices. How do I decide or know if I'm working on the RIGHT goal?'"
The key, he says, is to follow a process that helps define your goal in a concrete way and guides you toward taking the steps to make it a reality.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day to stay smart at work!

Advertisers of the day
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)
EMERITUS on Behalf of Columbia Business School Exec Ed: Enroll for the two-month Value Investing (Online) program

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.
TradeBriefs Editorial From the Editor's Desk

Elon Musk-backed AI Company Claims It Made a Text Generator That's Too Dangerous to Release
Researchers at the non-profit AI research group OpenAI just wanted to train their new text generation software to predict the next word in a sentence. It blew away all of their expectations and was so good at mimicking writing by humans they’ve decided to pump the brakes on the research while they explore the damage it could do.
Elon Musk has been clear that he believes artificial intelligence is the “biggest existential threat” to humanity. Musk is one of the primary funders of OpenAI and though he has taken a backseat role at the organization, its researchers appear to share his concerns about opening a Pandora’s box of trouble. This week, OpenAI shared a paper covering their latest work on text generation technology but they’re deviating from their standard practice of releasing the full research to the public out of fear that it could be abused by bad actors. Rather than releasing the fully trained model, it’s releasing a smaller model for researchers to experiment with.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, to understand the future!

Advertisers of the day
Cambridge Senior Management: Cambridge Senior Management Programme (SMP) | June 2019 | Accepting Applications
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.
TradeBriefs Editorial From the Editor's Desk

The secret history of women in coding
Computer programming once had much better gender balance than it does today. What went wrong?

When the number of coding jobs exploded in the 1950s and '60s as companies began relying on software to process payrolls and crunch data, men had no special advantage in being hired. Employers simply looked for candidates who were logical, good at math and meticulous. And in this respect, gender stereotypes worked in women's favor: Some executives argued that women's traditional expertise at painstaking activities like knitting and weaving manifested precisely this mind-set. (The 1968 book "Your Career in Computers" stated that people who like "cooking from a cookbook" make good programmers.)
The field rewarded aptitude: Applicants were often given a test (typically one involving pattern recognition), hired if they passed it and trained on the job, a process that made the field especially receptive to neophytes. "Know Nothing About Computers? Then We’ll Teach You (and Pay You While Doing So)," one British ad promised in 1965. In a 1957 recruiting pitch in the United States, IBM's brochure titled "My Fair Ladies" specifically encouraged women to apply for coding jobs.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, to get a historical perspective!

Advertisers of the day
Cambridge Senior Management: Cambridge Senior Management Programme (SMP) | June 2019 | Accepting Applications
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

Subcategories

You are here: Home Opinion