Opinion

Learning from the Feynman technique
Sree Vijaykumar
Sree Vijaykumar
From the Editor's Desk
They called Feynman the "Great Explainer." Richard Feynman (1918-1988), an author, graphic novel hero, intellectual, philosopher, physicist, and No Ordinary Genius is considered to be one of the most important physicists of all time. He pioneered an entire field: quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the 1940s, his invention of the Feynman Diagram helped bring much-needed visual clarification to the enigmatic behavior of subatomic particles. His work helping scientists understand the interaction of light and matter earned him a share of a Nobel Prize in 1965. His work has directly influenced the fields of nanotechnology, quantum computing, and particle physics. In 1986, his research and explanations were critical in helping to understand the cause of the space shuttle Challenger disaster. In addition to his groundbreaking research, Feynman was brilliant, eloquent, and an exquisitely passionate thinker. In the world of science, he stands unequivocally for his ability to synthesize and explain complex scientific knowledge. His lectures are the stuff of legend - Albert Einstein attended Feynman's first talk as a graduate student, and Bill Gates was so inspired by his pedagogy that he called Feynman, "the greatest teacher I never had." More here.

Introducing TradeBriefs SME - Print edition - Subscribe Now! | Sample copy

Advertisers of the day
Standard Chartered Bank (Personal Loans): Your dream holiday is now closer than ever
On behalf of SAP India: Identify the perfect SAP solution for your business in 3 easy steps
shivkhera: Optimize Performance and Move Up to the Next Level : Programs by Mr. Shiv Khera  

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails (B2B Decision-Makers, B2C Decision-Makers, TradeBriefs Premium).
 


Page 4 of 534